Where she doesn’t actually have that cup of tea!

Today I wanted to tell you a little story and share a very special cup.

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My father was British and a doctor and a collector of antiques.

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His very old leather doctor’s bag sits on the high shelf in the “James Bond” bathroom and holds the aspirins, bandaids and cough medicines. Another, larger doctor’s bag with drawer, holds my collection of fun and vintage jewellery.

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He particularly loved wooden boxes of every kind, especially Victorian British medical boxes.

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Yesterday I was doing some work on my Vanitas photography and left out two of his medical boxes to photograph for this post.

box 3

Years ago, I can’t really remember, but I think I wasn’t a teen yet, he gave me this cup for my birthday. The mark suggests it is 1940′s Kunst Kronach Burgund.

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It always looked like a jewel to me. I always had it sitting on a shelf or, later, in my china cabinet and always loved it and looked at it.

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I know it was made for tea, to drink tea from, but I worry too much about pouring the hot tea into the delicate, irreplaceable cup and so I don’t use it.

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It stands on display as a treasured jewel and looks beautiful, and that’s enough for me.

Linking with Teri at Artful Affirmations and thinking a lot of the country is stormy right now, and Sandi at Rose Chintz Cottage and saying HAPPY BIRTHDAY to her uncle Doug, Wow 90 yrs young! And to Bernideen and thinking I’ve got to get me some chalk paint. :)

Thanks for passing by: ↓

Veronica Karen Jocelyn JoAnn Bayne Sara v sophielipatoff Artful Affirmations vastlycurious.com Lavender Cottage Bernideen's Tea Time Blog Catherine Llewellyn Patty Sandi cecilia FABBY Diane

Comments

  1. Hi Veronica,
    I just love the teacup. I understand why you don’t want to use it – it is just sooo beautiful! I am also worried about using some of my favourites too. How special that your father gave you a teacup! Thank you for sharing!
    Take care,
    Karen @karenscastleandcottage.blogspot.ca

    • Veronica says:

      Hi Karen, it’s true, isn’t it? Some things are just to precious to put to use. I’d rather not take the chance. Off to visit you now. :)

  2. What a very special teacup. I love your post. Thank you for sharing your sweet story.

    • Veronica says:

      Hi Jocelyn, thank youf ro your kind words and for stopping by. :) I’m off to visit you now.

  3. Veronica, that is an incredibly lovely teacup–and definitely a jewel. Thank you for sharing it and the boxes–those are so fun! :-)

    • Veronica says:

      Sara, oh my gosh, those bottles are still full of stuff…pills, ointments, oils, powders…and the drawers contain lead boxes that I don’t dare touch. Sometimes I feel that if health and safety were to visit my home everything would be confiscated…lol. But they are totally great to explore…while not opening any lids! :)

  4. Tu as raison c’est vraiment un bijou cette tasse!
    et quelles merveilleux souvenirs de famille!
    bises
    Sophie

    • Veronica says:

      Merci beaucoup cher Sophie, I think it’s vital to preserve and share family treasures. One day I will pass the treasures to my children. :)

  5. Hello Veronica. I am mesmerized by your amazing photographs! And the story of your father….or at least the bit you share here, he is fascinating. His medical bag has been put to good use, as well as his other items. That is fab that you incorporate these items to creatively in your life. What a fine cup he gave you. Sometimes when I find a particularly good cup that is older…I will at least hesitate and wonder if the hot water will reveal a tiny crack I had not seen, and then crack the cup. So I think if my father had given me the cup, I may not risk it either! It is very lovely. Thank you for sharing with us : )
    Hugs,
    Terri

    • Veronica says:

      Hi Teri, thank you so much, you’re a sweet sweetie. (I’ve had a lot of practice) :) I like your style! I didn’t even think of a hairline crack, but that is such a good point. Thank you so much for hosting again this week. Hugs right back. :)

  6. The cup and saucer does look like a jewel. Your father must have been a very interesting man.

    • Veronica says:

      Hi Kathryn, thank you so much. He was a brilliant doctor and a very shrewd collector. He had a good eye and he knew how to work the auctions. I wish I learned more about buying valuable collections from him. :)

  7. Veronica, I enjoyed seeing your father’s old medical equipment. The teacup he gifted you is very pretty and a treasure to pass on. I don’t blame you for not wanting to use it but at least it can be admired if on display.
    Judith

  8. Now that is one really special cup and saucer and I’m so glad you shared it by linking to Friends Sharing Tea!

  9. Such a precious and beautiful teacup. I love how rich and elegant it is.

    LaDonna
    Gracious Hospitality

    • Veronica says:

      Hi LaDonna, thank you so much. It is a very rich looking cup, isn’t it? Probably should be in some Edwardian sitting room. :)

  10. Oh my, I can certainly see why that cup is a special treasure and one that you only want on display. Thanks for sharing it’s beauty and story.

    • Veronica says:

      Hi Kitty, thank you so much for stopping by. I’m really enjoying getting to know you, and all the tea time gals. :)

  11. Sometimes something is so special we must keep it as a treasure. It is a very delicate, beautiful teacup and a lovely gift from a father to a daughter. Patty/BC

  12. Hi Veronica,
    Your father sounds like a fascinating man with hobbies to inspire. What a collection you have. I love the medical bag and how you have put it to use. The teacup is truly stunning and too precious to use really. I am careful too with very old china. For the teacups, I always place a silver spoon into the cup and pour the water or tea onto the spoon. I have never had a cup break on me using this method. But in the case of your precious treasure, I think I might just enjoy it without the tea in it. It’s a beauty! Thank you so much for sharing with us and have a lovely Mother’s Day.

    Blessings,
    Sandi

    • Veronica says:

      Hi Sandi, thank you so much for hosting again this week. Sorry for the late reply. Here we are at the weekend, I hope you have a lovely one. :)

  13. Oh i am deeply envious of those medicine boxes, all those terrifying heavy metal medicines too in their little bottles, what treasure. That tea cup is the most stunning colour, so beautiful, you could design a whole room around that cup and its saucer. The wind is coming up now, I think we may be on for a storm too today! Lovely..yikes, i had better get out and clear the verandah table, things are beginning to blow! c

    • Veronica says:

      Hi Celi, Gosh, I’m so late replying to this post…where has the week gone? I love the little boxes too, and no, I will not open the bottles. :)

  14. Anita Rivera says:

    Good morning Veronica! Nice to meet you this morning!

    I will put your name on my list of bloggers who will have a France post up by NEXT FRIDAY, May 17th. The idea is to meet new friends under this common theme of linking and visiting each others’ posts and leaving comments. Did you want to have a chance to win Vicki Archer’s book? Let me know. Your name and LINK will also appear next week as the party starts. If you have any questions, please come and leave me your comment. Anita

  15. Hi Varonica, The tea cup is so beautiful, I understand that you dare not to use it ~ precious memories connected to this special cup! I enjoyed seeing the old medicine box!

    • Veronica says:

      Hi Nina, I’m so glad you enjoyed the photos. Wish you could smell those boxes; they smell so potently even after all those years. :)

  16. What a gorgeous tea cup! I wonder where the others in the set are? :) I know I’d love to find one!

  17. Oh! I would never ever use that teacup to drink tea from. It’s too pretty and I would fear breaking it.

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